OSTG | SourceForgeThinkGeekIT Product GuideLinux.comNewsForgefreshmeatNewslettersTechJobsSlashdot Broadband X 
Welcome to Slashdot
 Login
 Why Login?
 Why Subscribe?

 Sections
 Main
 Apache
 Apple
 AskSlashdot
  7 more
 Books
 BSD
 Developers
  1 more
 Games
  7 more
 Interviews
 IT
 Linux
  4 more
 Politics
 Science
  2 more
 YRO
 
 Help
 FAQ
 Bugs

 Stories
 Old Stories
 Old Polls
 Topics
 Hall of Fame
 Submit Story

 About
 Supporters
 Code
 Awards

 Services
 Broadband
 PriceGrabber
 Product Guide
 Special Offers
 Tech Jobs
 IT Research

SCO - What have WE Forgotten?
Caldera
The Almighty Buck
The Courts
Posted by Cliff on Tue Jan 06, '04 02:20 PM
from the daytraders-and-lawyers-live-on-different-planets-than-we-do dept.
Ed Almos asks: "When trying to examine the SCO affair with a cold analytical eye I can't help but be worried. Over the last twelve months the SCO stock price has climbed from just over a dollar to nearly eighteen dollars and at its peak it was well over twenty dollars. Hindsight is a wonderful thing and if I had invested my life savings in SCO stock last Christmas I would now be a multi-millionaire, examining which speedboat to buy instead of which bills to pay. Even a six month analysis of the stock price shows steady growth from about ten dollars to seventeen, a strange situation for a company which is supposed to be on its last legs. For years I had a friend who worked in the petroleum industry as a deep sea diver. Deep sea diving is one of the most dangerous jobs on the planet and when you looked at Matt's desk the first thing you saw was a wooden sign asking 'what have I forgotten?' When you are three hundred feet down the last thing you want is to find out you have forgotten an important tool, it's bad news all round. Matt lived to a ripe old age so I suspect that the sign worked. We all need to ask the same question about the SCO affair, what have we forgotten?"

"Over the last eight months I have read countless posts on Slashdot regarding SCO and most if not all of the posts view the scene with rose-tinted spectacles. Promises are made that SCO will be buried and that McBride will find himself in prison, yet they are still there and McBride is still in charge. The men and women who play the stock market on a regular basis are no fools and something unknown to Slashdot readers made the SCO stock price rise by 2.4%, on December 26th, over half a days trading. If someone buys a stock they expect the price to rise, so what have WE forgotten that could be good news for SCO investors? The principle of 'many eyes' has been used by the Open Source movement before. Thousands of people examine source code, submit patches, and ensure that we give the best software we can to the community at large. Bugs are announced and fixed within hours and all of us know that this methodology provides a better solution than that offered by closed source products. We now need to apply the same methodology to the SCO problem, all of us need to consider what we know about this sorry affair and how we can legally contribute to the downfall of the SCO Group.

SCO have been ordered to produce their evidence against IBM by midnight on January 11th, 2004. This gives us [five days] to make sure that when the IBM lawyer marches into court he has a spring in his step, knowing that he has every Linux user on the planet behind him. THEN we can talk about SCO being buried, but not before.

Thank you for your time and a Happy New Year."

 

 
Slashdot Log In
Nickname:

Password:

Public Terminal

[ Create a new account ]

Related Links
· Compare the best prices on: Software/Operating Systems
· five days
· Ed Almos
· More Caldera stories
· Also by Cliff
 
 
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.
SCO - What have WE Forgotten? | Log in/Create an Account | Top | 738 comments | Search Discussion
Threshold:
The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.
 
  I enjoy the time that we spend together.
All trademarks and copyrights on this page are owned by their respective owners. Comments are owned by the Poster. The Rest © 1997-2004 OSTG.
[ home | awards | contribute story | older articles | OSTG | advertise | about | terms of service | privacy | faq | rss ]